CIN (Circumcision Information Network) 1:15

Journal  Circumcision Information Network, Volume 1, Issue 15. Thursday, 13 October 1994.

Richard Angell

Introduction
This weekly bulletin is a project of CIN, the Circumcision Information Network (formerly CIN CompuBulletin). The purpose of this weekly bulletin is to educate the public about and to protect children and other non-consenting persons from genital mutilation. Readers are encouraged to copy and redistribute it, and to contribute written material.
--Rich Angell, Editor.


THE MALE G-SPOT
This is from the October 1994 issue of Men's Health magazine.  On P133 there
is a column entitled "Ask men's health."  The first question from a reader:
"Lately, I've heard that some men might have a G-spot similar to women's.  I
wouldn't mind knowing if I'm one of them.  What's up with this?"  G.N.,
Dallas, TX.

Answer:  "This whole fascination with the G-spot has its roots, as far as we
can tell, in the fact that some women (some, not all) have a hard time
reaching orgasm, so any help is usually welcome there.  The G-spot actually
gets its name from Ernst Grafenberg, a German OB/BYN guy who claimed there
was a secret erotic hot spot on the 'roof' of the vagina, about 3 to 5 inches
in.  He argued that this region was so erotically charged that pressing on it
could produce orgasm completely independent of clitoral stimulation.

"Is there a male equivalent?  Actually, yes.  Not just one, but two.  (If
women can have them, why can't we?)  For educational purposes only, we turned
to Judith Seifer, Hph.D., R.N., president of the American Association of Sex
Educators, Counselors and Therapists.  The hottest spot of all, you probably
wouldn't be surprised to know, is the frenulum, that little ridge of skin
running down the underside of the penis below the head.  Here's why:  This
region contains bundles of sensitive nerve endings, more nerve endings per
inch than any other area.

"The other supersensitive spot is a small, soft dimple, about the size of a
dime, tucked just underneath the scrotum...."

Isn't that interesting?  But here's what they DON'T tell you:

1)  The purpose of the frenulum is to hold the foreskin in place over the
glans when the penis is flacid, keeping it soft, moist and sensitive, much
like the eyelid does for the eye.  When the foreskin is amputated during
circumcision, usually part, most, or all of the frenulum is amputated along
with it, depending on the severity of the circumcision.

(William Krueger of North Carolina was wrongfully circumcised as an adult.
 He says that before the cut, the frenulum was so sensitive, he could "shoot"
within a few minutes after gently applying pressure to it or stretching it.
 Now the frenulum, or what's left of it has only about 5% of the original
response and feeling.  Mr. Krueger is happy to talk with anyone who wants to
know what it's like to be both with and without a foreskin, (910) 724-3982.)

2)  During intercourse, the foreskin acts as a moveable sheath, gliding up
and down the shaft.  This greatly reduces friction and therefore the need for
artificial lubricants (a big business in the U.S.).  The skin makes the penis
feel bigger and more fulfilling (so to speak) inside the vagina.  Also, on
the back stroke, the foreskin is pulled up over the glans, providing extra
pleasurable sensation not only to the glans itself, but to the walls of the
vagina...including, needless to say, the woman's G-spot.

"ROUGHLY CUT"
A video by Niclas Vollmer.  "A fascinating look at the ritual of circumcision
that blossoms into realms of masculinity, male anatomy and sexuality."  Dr.
Buck Burns.  20:00 Saturday, 15 October 1994.  Part of the Other Cinema
series at Artists' Television Access, 992 Valencia St. (near 21st St. in San
Francisco) $5 Admission.  Tel. 415-824-3890.

NORM MEETING IN PHILADLEPHIA
NORM (Nat'l Org. of Restoring Men) of greater Philadelphia will be having a
foreskin restoration information night on Sunday evening, 16 October. from
19:00 to 21:00. All men are welcomed.  Rich DeSeabra from NORM-NYC will be
present to answer questions and provide additional information.  Rich has
been interviewed several times in print and on television, and is scheduled
to appear on network television this fall. For more information contact:
NORM, P.O. Box 534, Collegeville, PA 19426 or albfie@delphi.com.

NURSES SAY NO TO CIRCUMCISION
NOCIRC of Washington Presents an evening of Education and Support for the
Nurses of St. Vincent.  Come hear why these women feel strongly enough about
circumcision to put their jobs on the line.   The Northwest Premier:  The
Nurses of St Vincent Saying No To Circumcision.

A powerful documentary film showing why these women have challenged the
prevailing logic and medical ethics of infant circumcision. We invite you to
attend this important evening of information and sharing as we support these
courageous nurses in their action on behalf of male infants. 

Thursday, 10 November 1994, 19:00 at the Mountaineers Building, Skagit Room,
300 Third Avenue West, Seattle,WA. 98119.  $10 Donation  proceeds go directly
to the nurses

Contact NOCIRC of Washington for reservations. (206) 547-3350

Special guest speakers:  Marilyn Milos: In 1985 Marilyn was fired from her
job as a nurse for speaking out against circumcision. She is the National
Director and founder of NOCIRC. 

Six Nurses:  Betty Sperlich, Mary Conant, Carol Alley, Mary Rose Booker, Sara
McMurray and Jessie Wind, are traveling to Seattle for this event. 

Steve Scott: NOCIRC of Utah, will be presenting new anatomical research by
Dr. John Taylor of the University of Mannitoba, which identifies the foreskin
as a complex, extremely nerve laden and integral part of the male anatomy. 
Citation:

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